Commit 00343c7f authored by Alexey Gladkov's avatar Alexey Gladkov

Use automake

Signed-off-by: 's avatarMike Frysinger <vapier@gentoo.org>
Signed-off-by: 's avatarAlexey Gladkov <legion@altlinux.org>
parent a90816fc
*.o
autom4te.cache
config.h.in~
Makefile.in
!po/Makefile.in
aclocal.m4
config.guess
config.sub
configure
depcomp
install-sh
missing
The programs loadkeys, dumpkeys and showkey were derived from
Risto Kankkunen's kbd-0.81.
The font loading code goes back to the codepage package by
Joel Hoffman (joel@wam.umd.edu). (He tells me that the original
reference is: "From: p. 307 of _Programmer's Guide to PC & PS/2
Video Systems_ by Richard Wilton. 1987. Microsoft Press".)
The kernel and user interface for the font loading were derived
from Eugene Crosser's intl_con package.
[Similar things were done earlier by
Jerry Kaidor (tr2!jerry@abekas.com, jkaidor@synoptics.com) : fontpak,
H. Peter Anvin (hpa@nwu.edu) and Pavel Zaboj (xzaboj@vse.cs).
Their code was not used, but the Latin-1 *.psf fonts were developed
by H. Peter Anvin, and the Latin-2 ones by Pavel Zaboj.]
Installation Instructions
*************************
Copyright (C) 1994, 1995, 1996, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005 Free
Software Foundation, Inc.
This file is free documentation; the Free Software Foundation gives
unlimited permission to copy, distribute and modify it.
Basic Installation
==================
These are generic installation instructions.
The `configure' shell script attempts to guess correct values for
various system-dependent variables used during compilation. It uses
those values to create a `Makefile' in each directory of the package.
It may also create one or more `.h' files containing system-dependent
definitions. Finally, it creates a shell script `config.status' that
you can run in the future to recreate the current configuration, and a
file `config.log' containing compiler output (useful mainly for
debugging `configure').
It can also use an optional file (typically called `config.cache'
and enabled with `--cache-file=config.cache' or simply `-C') that saves
the results of its tests to speed up reconfiguring. (Caching is
disabled by default to prevent problems with accidental use of stale
cache files.)
If you need to do unusual things to compile the package, please try
to figure out how `configure' could check whether to do them, and mail
diffs or instructions to the address given in the `README' so they can
be considered for the next release. If you are using the cache, and at
some point `config.cache' contains results you don't want to keep, you
may remove or edit it.
The file `configure.ac' (or `configure.in') is used to create
`configure' by a program called `autoconf'. You only need
`configure.ac' if you want to change it or regenerate `configure' using
a newer version of `autoconf'.
The simplest way to compile this package is:
1. `cd' to the directory containing the package's source code and type
`./configure' to configure the package for your system. If you're
using `csh' on an old version of System V, you might need to type
`sh ./configure' instead to prevent `csh' from trying to execute
`configure' itself.
Running `configure' takes awhile. While running, it prints some
messages telling which features it is checking for.
2. Type `make' to compile the package.
3. Optionally, type `make check' to run any self-tests that come with
the package.
4. Type `make install' to install the programs and any data files and
documentation.
5. You can remove the program binaries and object files from the
source code directory by typing `make clean'. To also remove the
files that `configure' created (so you can compile the package for
a different kind of computer), type `make distclean'. There is
also a `make maintainer-clean' target, but that is intended mainly
for the package's developers. If you use it, you may have to get
all sorts of other programs in order to regenerate files that came
with the distribution.
Compilers and Options
=====================
Some systems require unusual options for compilation or linking that the
`configure' script does not know about. Run `./configure --help' for
details on some of the pertinent environment variables.
You can give `configure' initial values for configuration parameters
by setting variables in the command line or in the environment. Here
is an example:
./configure CC=c89 CFLAGS=-O2 LIBS=-lposix
*Note Defining Variables::, for more details.
Compiling For Multiple Architectures
====================================
You can compile the package for more than one kind of computer at the
same time, by placing the object files for each architecture in their
own directory. To do this, you must use a version of `make' that
supports the `VPATH' variable, such as GNU `make'. `cd' to the
directory where you want the object files and executables to go and run
the `configure' script. `configure' automatically checks for the
source code in the directory that `configure' is in and in `..'.
If you have to use a `make' that does not support the `VPATH'
variable, you have to compile the package for one architecture at a
time in the source code directory. After you have installed the
package for one architecture, use `make distclean' before reconfiguring
for another architecture.
Installation Names
==================
By default, `make install' installs the package's commands under
`/usr/local/bin', include files under `/usr/local/include', etc. You
can specify an installation prefix other than `/usr/local' by giving
`configure' the option `--prefix=PREFIX'.
You can specify separate installation prefixes for
architecture-specific files and architecture-independent files. If you
pass the option `--exec-prefix=PREFIX' to `configure', the package uses
PREFIX as the prefix for installing programs and libraries.
Documentation and other data files still use the regular prefix.
In addition, if you use an unusual directory layout you can give
options like `--bindir=DIR' to specify different values for particular
kinds of files. Run `configure --help' for a list of the directories
you can set and what kinds of files go in them.
If the package supports it, you can cause programs to be installed
with an extra prefix or suffix on their names by giving `configure' the
option `--program-prefix=PREFIX' or `--program-suffix=SUFFIX'.
Optional Features
=================
Some packages pay attention to `--enable-FEATURE' options to
`configure', where FEATURE indicates an optional part of the package.
They may also pay attention to `--with-PACKAGE' options, where PACKAGE
is something like `gnu-as' or `x' (for the X Window System). The
`README' should mention any `--enable-' and `--with-' options that the
package recognizes.
For packages that use the X Window System, `configure' can usually
find the X include and library files automatically, but if it doesn't,
you can use the `configure' options `--x-includes=DIR' and
`--x-libraries=DIR' to specify their locations.
Specifying the System Type
==========================
There may be some features `configure' cannot figure out automatically,
but needs to determine by the type of machine the package will run on.
Usually, assuming the package is built to be run on the _same_
architectures, `configure' can figure that out, but if it prints a
message saying it cannot guess the machine type, give it the
`--build=TYPE' option. TYPE can either be a short name for the system
type, such as `sun4', or a canonical name which has the form:
CPU-COMPANY-SYSTEM
where SYSTEM can have one of these forms:
OS KERNEL-OS
See the file `config.sub' for the possible values of each field. If
`config.sub' isn't included in this package, then this package doesn't
need to know the machine type.
If you are _building_ compiler tools for cross-compiling, you should
use the option `--target=TYPE' to select the type of system they will
produce code for.
If you want to _use_ a cross compiler, that generates code for a
platform different from the build platform, you should specify the
"host" platform (i.e., that on which the generated programs will
eventually be run) with `--host=TYPE'.
Sharing Defaults
================
If you want to set default values for `configure' scripts to share, you
can create a site shell script called `config.site' that gives default
values for variables like `CC', `cache_file', and `prefix'.
`configure' looks for `PREFIX/share/config.site' if it exists, then
`PREFIX/etc/config.site' if it exists. Or, you can set the
`CONFIG_SITE' environment variable to the location of the site script.
A warning: not all `configure' scripts look for a site script.
Defining Variables
==================
Variables not defined in a site shell script can be set in the
environment passed to `configure'. However, some packages may run
configure again during the build, and the customized values of these
variables may be lost. In order to avoid this problem, you should set
them in the `configure' command line, using `VAR=value'. For example:
./configure CC=/usr/local2/bin/gcc
causes the specified `gcc' to be used as the C compiler (unless it is
overridden in the site shell script). Here is a another example:
/bin/bash ./configure CONFIG_SHELL=/bin/bash
Here the `CONFIG_SHELL=/bin/bash' operand causes subsequent
configuration-related scripts to be executed by `/bin/bash'.
`configure' Invocation
======================
`configure' recognizes the following options to control how it operates.
`--help'
`-h'
Print a summary of the options to `configure', and exit.
`--version'
`-V'
Print the version of Autoconf used to generate the `configure'
script, and exit.
`--cache-file=FILE'
Enable the cache: use and save the results of the tests in FILE,
traditionally `config.cache'. FILE defaults to `/dev/null' to
disable caching.
`--config-cache'
`-C'
Alias for `--cache-file=config.cache'.
`--quiet'
`--silent'
`-q'
Do not print messages saying which checks are being made. To
suppress all normal output, redirect it to `/dev/null' (any error
messages will still be shown).
`--srcdir=DIR'
Look for the package's source code in directory DIR. Usually
`configure' can determine that directory automatically.
`configure' also accepts some other, not widely useful, options. Run
`configure --help' for more details.
EXTRA_DIST = contrib doc rc
SUBDIRS = src man data po
SUBDIRS = src po data man
all:
for i in $(SUBDIRS); do $(MAKE) -C $$i all || exit 1; done
install: install-progs install-data install-man
install-progs:
for i in $(SUBDIRS); do $(MAKE) -C $$i install || exit 1; done
install-man:
$(MAKE) -C man install
install-data:
$(MAKE) -C data install
clean:
for i in $(SUBDIRS); do $(MAKE) -C $$i clean || exit 1; done
reallyclean distclean spotless: clean
find . -name "*~" -exec rm {} ";"
for i in $(SUBDIRS); do $(MAKE) -C $$i distclean || exit 1; done
rm -f config.h Makefile configure config.status config.log
......@@ -8,12 +8,6 @@ The current version of kbd might not work anymore on kernels older than that.
This distribution contains no binaries - the sources depend on the
kernel version - compile them yourself.
To install this package, unpack it somewhere and issue the commands
"./configure", "make" and "make install". This copies the utilities
to /usr/bin, man pages to /usr/man/man{1,4,5,8} and data files to the
subdirectories keymaps, unimaps, consolefonts, consoletrans and videomodes
of the datadirectory chosen during configure, probably /usr/share/kbd.
The home site of this package is
ftp://ftp.win.tue.nl/pub/linux-local/utils/kbd/
......
#! /bin/sh
# Wrapper for compilers which do not understand `-c -o'.
scriptversion=2005-05-14.22
# Copyright (C) 1999, 2000, 2003, 2004, 2005 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
# Written by Tom Tromey <tromey@cygnus.com>.
#
# This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
# it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
# the Free Software Foundation; either version 2, or (at your option)
# any later version.
#
# This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
# but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
# MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the
# GNU General Public License for more details.
#
# You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
# along with this program; if not, write to the Free Software
# Foundation, Inc., 51 Franklin Street, Fifth Floor, Boston, MA 02110-1301, USA.
# As a special exception to the GNU General Public License, if you
# distribute this file as part of a program that contains a
# configuration script generated by Autoconf, you may include it under
# the same distribution terms that you use for the rest of that program.
# This file is maintained in Automake, please report
# bugs to <bug-automake@gnu.org> or send patches to
# <automake-patches@gnu.org>.
case $1 in
'')
echo "$0: No command. Try \`$0 --help' for more information." 1>&2
exit 1;
;;
-h | --h*)
cat <<\EOF
Usage: compile [--help] [--version] PROGRAM [ARGS]
Wrapper for compilers which do not understand `-c -o'.
Remove `-o dest.o' from ARGS, run PROGRAM with the remaining
arguments, and rename the output as expected.
If you are trying to build a whole package this is not the
right script to run: please start by reading the file `INSTALL'.
Report bugs to <bug-automake@gnu.org>.
EOF
exit $?
;;
-v | --v*)
echo "compile $scriptversion"
exit $?
;;
esac
ofile=
cfile=
eat=
for arg
do
if test -n "$eat"; then
eat=
else
case $1 in
-o)
# configure might choose to run compile as `compile cc -o foo foo.c'.
# So we strip `-o arg' only if arg is an object.
eat=1
case $2 in
*.o | *.obj)
ofile=$2
;;
*)
set x "$@" -o "$2"
shift
;;
esac
;;
*.c)
cfile=$1
set x "$@" "$1"
shift
;;
*)
set x "$@" "$1"
shift
;;
esac
fi
shift
done
if test -z "$ofile" || test -z "$cfile"; then
# If no `-o' option was seen then we might have been invoked from a
# pattern rule where we don't need one. That is ok -- this is a
# normal compilation that the losing compiler can handle. If no
# `.c' file was seen then we are probably linking. That is also
# ok.
exec "$@"
fi
# Name of file we expect compiler to create.
cofile=`echo "$cfile" | sed -e 's|^.*/||' -e 's/\.c$/.o/'`
# Create the lock directory.
# Note: use `[/.-]' here to ensure that we don't use the same name
# that we are using for the .o file. Also, base the name on the expected
# object file name, since that is what matters with a parallel build.
lockdir=`echo "$cofile" | sed -e 's|[/.-]|_|g'`.d
while true; do
if mkdir "$lockdir" >/dev/null 2>&1; then
break
fi
sleep 1
done
# FIXME: race condition here if user kills between mkdir and trap.
trap "rmdir '$lockdir'; exit 1" 1 2 15
# Run the compile.
"$@"
ret=$?
if test -f "$cofile"; then
mv "$cofile" "$ofile"
elif test -f "${cofile}bj"; then
mv "${cofile}bj" "$ofile"
fi
rmdir "$lockdir"
exit $ret
# Local Variables:
# mode: shell-script
# sh-indentation: 2
# eval: (add-hook 'write-file-hooks 'time-stamp)
# time-stamp-start: "scriptversion="
# time-stamp-format: "%:y-%02m-%02d.%02H"
# time-stamp-end: "$"
# End:
......@@ -136,6 +136,12 @@
slash. */
#undef LSTAT_FOLLOWS_SLASHED_SYMLINK
/* Define to 1 if your C compiler doesn't accept -c and -o together. */
#undef NO_MINUS_C_MINUS_O
/* Name of package */
#undef PACKAGE
/* Define to the address where bug reports for this package should be sent. */
#undef PACKAGE_BUGREPORT
......@@ -163,6 +169,9 @@
/* Define to 1 if your <sys/time.h> declares `struct tm'. */
#undef TM_IN_SYS_TIME
/* Version number of package */
#undef VERSION
/* Define to 1 if `lex' declares `yytext' as a `char *' by default, not a
`char[]'. */
#undef YYTEXT_POINTER
......
# -*- Autoconf -*-
# Process this file with autoconf to produce a configure script.
AC_PREREQ(2.59)
AC_PREREQ(2.60)
AC_INIT(kbd, 1.14.1, gladkov.alexey@gmail.com)
AM_INIT_AUTOMAKE
AC_CONFIG_SRCDIR([src/showkey.c])
AC_CONFIG_HEADERS(config.h)
# Checks for programs.
AC_PROG_YACC
AC_PROG_CC
AM_PROG_CC_C_O
AC_PROG_LEX
AC_PROG_SED
AC_PROG_INSTALL
AC_PROG_LN_S
AC_PROG_MAKE_SET
......@@ -45,31 +48,23 @@ AC_CHECK_FUNCS([alarm memset setlocale strcasecmp strchr strdup strerror \
strspn strstr strtol strtoul])
case $host_cpu in
m68*|sparc*) KEYCODES_PROGS= ;;
m68*|sparc*) KEYCODES_PROGS=no ;;
*) KEYCODES_PROGS=yes ;;
esac
AC_SUBST(KEYCODES_PROGS)
AM_CONDITIONAL(KEYCODES_PROGS, test "$KEYCODES_PROGS" = "yes")
case $host_cpu in
i?86*) RESIZECONS_PROGS=yes ;;
*) RESIZECONS_PROGS= ;;
*) RESIZECONS_PROGS=no ;;
esac
AC_SUBST(RESIZECONS_PROGS)
AM_CONDITIONAL(RESIZECONS_PROGS, test "$RESIZECONS_PROGS" = "yes")
AC_ARG_ENABLE(optional-progs,
AS_HELP_STRING(--enable-optional-progs, [Build and install a optional programs]),
[OPTIONAL_PROGS=$enableval],[OPTIONAL_PROGS=no])
AC_SUBST(OPTIONAL_PROGS)
AC_ARG_ENABLE(strip,
AS_HELP_STRING(--enable-strip, [Enable stripping of executables]),
[ENABLE_STRIP=$enableval], [ENABLE_STRIP=no])
AC_SUBST(ENABLE_STRIP)
AM_CONDITIONAL(OPTIONAL_PROGS, test "$OPTIONAL_PROGS" = "yes")
# For lib/nls.h: do we have <libintl.h> and gettext() ?
AC_ARG_ENABLE(nls, AS_HELP_STRING(--enable-nls, [NLS support]),
[enable_nls=$enableval], [enable_nls=no])
......@@ -93,6 +88,16 @@ AC_SUBST(HAVE_XGETTEXT)
AC_CONFIG_FILES([Makefile
data/Makefile
man/Makefile
man/man1/Makefile
man/man1/dumpkeys.1
man/man1/loadkeys.1
man/man1misc/Makefile
man/man5/Makefile
man/man8/Makefile
man/man8/loadunimap.8
man/man8/mapscrn.8
man/man8/setfont.8
man/man8misc/Makefile
po/Makefile
src/Makefile])
AC_OUTPUT
prefix = @prefix@
datarootdir = @datarootdir@
datadir = $(DESTDIR)@datadir@
EXTRA_DIST = consolefonts consoletrans keymaps partialfonts unimaps
# If you change the names of any of the following subdirs,
# also change paths.h.
......@@ -15,52 +13,48 @@ KEYMAPSUBDIRS = include sun amiga atari i386/azerty i386/dvorak \
i386/fgGIod i386/qwerty i386/qwertz i386/include i386/olpc \
mac/include mac/all
# Do not use GZIP - it is interpreted by gzip
MYGZIP = gzip -f -9
all: $(KEYMAPDIR)_Z $(FONTDIR)_Z
install: all
install -d -m 755 $(datadir)
install -d -m 755 $(datadir)/$(FONTDIR)
install -m 644 $(FONTDIR)_Z/* $(datadir)/$(FONTDIR)
install -d -m 755 $(datadir)/$(FONTDIR)/$(PARTIALDIR)
install -m 644 $(PARTIALDIR)_Z/* $(datadir)/$(FONTDIR)/$(PARTIALDIR)
install -d -m 755 $(datadir)/$(TRANSDIR)
install -m 644 $(TRANSDIR)/* $(datadir)/$(TRANSDIR)
install -d -m 755 $(datadir)/$(UNIMAPDIR)
install -m 644 $(UNIMAPDIR)/* $(datadir)/$(UNIMAPDIR)
install -d -m 755 $(datadir)/$(KEYMAPDIR)
install -d -m 755 $(datadir)/$(KEYMAPDIR)/i386
install -d -m 755 $(datadir)/$(KEYMAPDIR)/mac
install-data-hook: $(KEYMAPDIR)_Z $(FONTDIR)_Z
install -d -m 755 $(DESTDIR)$(datadir)
install -d -m 755 $(DESTDIR)$(datadir)/$(FONTDIR)
install -m 644 $(FONTDIR)_Z/* $(DESTDIR)$(datadir)/$(FONTDIR)
install -d -m 755 $(DESTDIR)$(datadir)/$(FONTDIR)/$(PARTIALDIR)
install -m 644 $(PARTIALDIR)_Z/* $(DESTDIR)$(datadir)/$(FONTDIR)/$(PARTIALDIR)
install -d -m 755 $(DESTDIR)$(datadir)/$(TRANSDIR)
install -m 644 $(srcdir)/$(TRANSDIR)/* $(DESTDIR)$(datadir)/$(TRANSDIR)
install -d -m 755 $(DESTDIR)$(datadir)/$(UNIMAPDIR)
install -m 644 $(srcdir)/$(UNIMAPDIR)/* $(DESTDIR)$(datadir)/$(UNIMAPDIR)
install -d -m 755 $(DESTDIR)$(datadir)/$(KEYMAPDIR)
install -d -m 755 $(DESTDIR)$(datadir)/$(KEYMAPDIR)/i386
install -d -m 755 $(DESTDIR)$(datadir)/$(KEYMAPDIR)/mac
for i in $(KEYMAPSUBDIRS); do \
install -d -m 755 $(datadir)/$(KEYMAPDIR)/$$i ;\
install -m 644 $(KEYMAPDIR)_Z/$$i/* $(datadir)/$(KEYMAPDIR)/$$i ;\
install -d -m 755 $(DESTDIR)$(datadir)/$(KEYMAPDIR)/$$i ;\
install -m 644 $(KEYMAPDIR)_Z/$$i/* $(DESTDIR)$(datadir)/$(KEYMAPDIR)/$$i ;\
done
rm -f $(datadir)/$(KEYMAPDIR)/ppc; ln -s mac $(datadir)/$(KEYMAPDIR)/ppc
@if [ -f $(datadir)/$(OLDKEYMAPDIR) ]; then \
rm -f $(DESTDIR)$(datadir)/$(KEYMAPDIR)/ppc; ln -s mac $(DESTDIR)$(datadir)/$(KEYMAPDIR)/ppc
@if [ -f $(DESTDIR)$(datadir)/$(OLDKEYMAPDIR) ]; then \
echo "Done. You may want to remove old keymaps with" ; \
echo " rm -rf $(datadir)/$(OLDKEYMAPDIR)" ; \
echo " rm -rf $(DESTDIR)$(datadir)/$(OLDKEYMAPDIR)" ; \
echo "But be careful to preserve your default map if it is" ; \
echo "nonstandard, and to adapt any scripts in rc.local or so." ; \
fi
# compress data files - do not touch the distribution but copy first
$(KEYMAPDIR)_Z:
cp -r $(KEYMAPDIR) $(KEYMAPDIR)_Z
cp -r $(srcdir)/$(KEYMAPDIR) $(KEYMAPDIR)_Z
cd $(KEYMAPDIR)_Z && $(MYGZIP) */*.map */*/*.map
$(FONTDIR)_Z:
cp -r $(FONTDIR) $(FONTDIR)_Z
cp -r $(PARTIALDIR) $(PARTIALDIR)_Z
cp -r $(srcdir)/$(FONTDIR) $(FONTDIR)_Z
cp -r $(srcdir)/$(PARTIALDIR) $(PARTIALDIR)_Z
cd $(FONTDIR)_Z && $(MYGZIP) * && gunzip ERRORS* README*
cd $(PARTIALDIR)_Z && $(MYGZIP) *
# (not yet screenmaps - some other time)
clean:
clean-local:
rm -rf $(KEYMAPDIR)_Z $(FONTDIR)_Z $(PARTIALDIR)_Z
distclean: clean
rm -f Makefile
uninstall-hook:
cd $(DESTDIR)$(datadir) && rm -rf $(FONTDIR) $(PARTIALDIR) $(TRANSDIR) $(UNIMAPDIR) $(KEYMAPDIR)
SUBDIRS = man1 man5 man8
if OPTIONAL_PROGS
SUBDIRS += man1misc man8misc
endif
prefix = @prefix@
datarootdir = @datarootdir@
datadir = $(DESTDIR)@datadir@
mandir = $(DESTDIR)@mandir@
OPTIONAL_PROGS = @OPTIONAL_PROGS@
# Generated files
GEN1 = man1/dumpkeys.1 man1/loadkeys.1
GEN8 = man8/setfont.8 man8/loadunimap.8 man8/mapscrn.8
MAN1DIRS = man1
MAN5DIRS = man5
MAN8DIRS = man8
ifdef OPTIONAL_PROGS
MAN1DIRS += man1misc
MAN8DIRS += man8misc
endif
all: $(GEN1) $(GEN8)
%: %.in
sed -e "s|\@datadir\@|$(datadir)|g" <$< >$@
install:
install -d -m 755 $(mandir)/man1 $(mandir)/man5 $(mandir)/man8; \
for d in $(MAN1DIRS); do \
install -m 644 $$d/*.[0-9] $(mandir)/man1/; \
done; \
for d in $(MAN5DIRS); do \
install -m 644 $$d/*.[0-9] $(mandir)/man5/; \
done; \
for d in $(MAN8DIRS); do \
install -m 644 $$d/*.[0-9] $(mandir)/man8/; \
done
clean:
rm -f $(GEN1) $(GEN8)
distclean: clean
rm -f Makefile
# Note: man?misc contains the man pages for non-installed
# programs from ../src. Most of these are tiny test programs,
# not very useful for anybody.
# But if you decide to install some of those, then here are the man pages.
gen_MANS = dumpkeys.1 loadkeys.1
dist_man_MANS = chvt.1 deallocvt.1 fgconsole.1 kbd_mode.1 openvt.1 \
psfaddtable.1 psfgettable.1 psfstriptable.1 psfxtable.1 \
setleds.1 setmetamode.1 showkey.1 unicode_start.1 unicode_stop.1 \
$(gen_MANS)
install-data-hook:
cd $(DESTDIR)$(mandir)/man1 && \
for f in $(gen_MANS); do \
$(SED) -e "s#@DATADIR\@#${datadir}#g" "$$f" > "$$f.new"; \
mv -f -- "$$f.new" "$$f"; \
done
......@@ -200,7 +200,7 @@ loadkeys how to interpret the keymap. (For example, "division" is
.SH FILES
.PD 0
.TP 20
.BI @datadir@/keymaps
.BI @DATADIR@/keymaps
recommended directory for keytable files
.PD
.SH "SEE ALSO"
......
......@@ -49,7 +49,7 @@ If the
loads a default keymap, probably the file
.I defkeymap.map
either in
.I @datadir@/keymaps
.I @DATADIR@/keymaps
or in
.IR /usr/src/linux/drivers/char .
(Probably the former was user-defined, while the latter
......@@ -163,7 +163,7 @@ outlive your session. This means that even at the login prompt the key
bindings may not be what the user expects.
.SH FILES
.TP
.BI @datadir@/keymaps
.BI @DATADIR@/keymaps
default directory for keymaps
.LP
.TP
......
dist_man_MANS = codepage.1 screendump.1 splitfont.1
dist_man_MANS = keymaps.5
gen_MANS = loadunimap.8 mapscrn.8 setfont.8
dist_man_MANS = getkeycodes.8 kbdrate.8 resizecons.8 setkeycodes.8 \
showconsolefont.8 $(gen_MANS)
install-data-hook:
cd $(DESTDIR)$(mandir)/man8 && \
for f in $(gen_MANS); do \
$(SED) -e "s#@DATADIR\@#${datadir}#g" "$$f" > "$$f.new"; \
mv -f -- "$$f.new" "$$f"; \
done
......@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ Usually one does not call
directly - its function is also built into